Top Stories of the Week – NBC 6 South Florida

Here are some of the best stories from last week from NBC 6 News:

Miami Skyline Lights Up Under Full Moon Kayaking in Biscayne Bay

For South Floridians, kayaking is an activity many have participated in at least once, but few can say they’ve done it under a full moon.

The Virginia Key Outdoor Center has offered a Full Moon Kayak Tour once a month for the past seven years.

The tour launches you into the lagoon near the center and, depending on the size of the group, there may be a few guides to lead the group on the trip. The tour welcomes kayakers of all skill levels, including those new to the activity.

Frank Fernandez, who has been kayaking for more than 20 years and is a guide for the Full Moon Tour, said he likes it when people are a little hesitant at first because when they see the Miami skyline , their worries disappear.

For the full story, click here.

NBC 6 will premiere “Decision 2022: The Florida Primary,” which can be seen on multiple platforms on Tuesday, August 23, beginning at 8:00 p.m. on election night.

How to Watch Florida Primary Election Results Coverage on NBC 6

NBC 6 will premiere “Decision 2022: The Florida Primary,” which can be seen on multiple platforms on Tuesday, August 23, beginning at 8:00 p.m. on election night.

The coverage, hosted by NBC 6’s Jackie Nespral and Jawan Stader, will include all the latest election results, as well as live coverage of major races, including Democratic gubernatorial and Senate races, congressional races states and several local races and referenda.

You can watch coverage on NBC6.com, the NBC 6 app, and mobile web or by downloading the NBC 6 app on Roku, Amazon Fire TV, and Apple TV.

The live coverage will also air in its entirety on the “NBC South Florida News” channel on Peacock, The Roku Channel and Samsung TV starting at 8:00 p.m.

To learn how to watch on Peacock, click here.

A South Florida man who died after eating raw oysters last month also had a number of drugs in his system, including cocaine and fentanyl, according to a medical examiner’s report.

Man who died after eating raw oysters also had drugs in his system: medical examiner

A South Florida man who died after eating raw oysters last month also had a number of drugs in his system, including cocaine and fentanyl, according to a medical examiner’s report.

The Broward County medical examiner’s report says Roger Pinckney, 44, tested positive for cannabis, cocaine, fentanyl, oxycodone and opiates after his death on July 31.

Pinckney’s blood also tested positive for vibrio vulnificus, a bacteria found in warm seawater.

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 80,000 people nationwide are infected with the vibrio each year and 100 of them die from the infection. You can become infected by exposing an open wound to seawater or by eating raw or undercooked oysters or shellfish.

The medical examiner’s report says Pinckney was out to celebrate his birthday on July 23 and was hospitalized with fever and abdominal pain after consuming oysters.

For the full story, click here.

A 10-year-old boy was airlifted to a Miami hospital where part of his leg was amputated after being attacked by a shark in the Florida Keys over the weekend. NBC 6’s Jamie Guirola reports

10-year-old boy loses part of his leg in Florida Keys shark attack

A 10-year-old boy was airlifted to a Miami hospital where he had part of his leg amputated after being attacked by a shark in the Florida Keys over the weekend, members of his family said. family.

Jameson Reeder Jr. and his family were snorkeling along a shallow reef on Saturday when he was attacked by what is believed to be an 8ft bull shark, his uncle Joshua Reeder said , in a lengthy Facebook post.

The incident happened around 4 p.m. near Looe Key Reef, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials told Keysnews.com.

The shark bit the boy just below the knee, and his family pulled him into a boat and put a tourniquet on just above the bite to stop the bleeding, the post said.

For the full story, click here.

NBC 6 investigator Willard Shepard has the story you’ll only see on 6.

UM researchers play matchmaker to help coral reefs reproduce

It’s the search for romance down there. We would normally tell you that love is in the air, but in this case there is no need for air.

It turns out that after dark in mid-August is a good time for corals to move on to the next generation – their growth is vital to protecting South Florida’s coastline. Now, the Department of Defense is funding the University of Miami’s efforts to help with breeding for the first time.

I was the only local reporter in South Florida to dive below to see how it worked.

As the sun sets here in the Atlantic, marine biologist from the Rosenstiel School of the University of Miami uses the remaining daylight to observe this coral reef. They’re looking to see if everything is in order for the perfect date – when staghorn corals spawn.

For the full story, click here.

Animal communicator and author Lydia Hiby gives potential adopters advice on what to consider before entering the shelter.

Clear Shelters: Here’s a full list of participating shelters in South Florida

Although the national Clear the Shelters campaign is coming to an end, there is still time to welcome a four-legged friend into your family.

This year’s campaign included more than 1,000 animal shelters and rescues across the United States, Puerto Rico and Guam.

For a complete list of participating South Florida pet shelters and foster families, click here

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